Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones

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Atomic Habits

Leader’s Edge (Leadership)

Atomic Habits: An Easy & Proven Way to Build Good Habits & Break Bad Ones

James Clear

Avery, 2018, 320 pages

Summary

This is a detailed treatment of the importance of habits, how they are formed, how they can be maintained over time, and the challenges we face in keeping them. The premise of the book is that small changes contribute to significant differences over time. The author provides a four-part framework for habit formation (cue, craving, response, and reward). Many tips and suggestions are provided on how to follow this formula to help the leader implement positive habits while also limiting bad habits.


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