New missions tool: Aviation Effectiveness Research (AER)

The Aviation Effectiveness Research (AER) evaluated the effectiveness of missionary aviation at advancing people’s work in the five basic transportation contexts found around the world.

Between April 2015 and January 2018, in-depth interviews were conducted with 324 air service users in Cameroon, Niger, Brazil, Peru, Indonesia, the Philippines, and Papua New Guinea. The survey questions contrasted air travel with surface travel, and covered all seven functions of missionary aviation. In addition, open-ended questions explored whether aviation helps organizations reach their goals and whether it impacts the kingdom of God. The result was a high-resolution picture of how, and to what extent, missionary aviation advanced people’s work.

The project was commissioned by JAARS and, upon completion, was transferred to IAMA (the International Association of Missionary Aviation). The AER was designed to:

  1. enable leaders to make knowledgeable decisions about when, where, and for whom, to use or not use aviation worldwide,
  2. wisely align organizational resources to accomplish kingdom goals, and
  3. inform, or educate, people regarding aviation decisions.

The research findings can be found at: aerproject.info.


The AER was commissioned by JAARS, a member of Missio Nexus. JAARS and IAMA are making the AER findings available at no cost.


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